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Videos uploaded by user “unlbosr”
AN INTRODUCTION TO EVALUATION RESEARCH
 
54:15
Almost every funding agency now wants an “evaluation” of your projects’ success. But, what is evaluation? What are those scary terms like formative, summative, outcomes, and logic models? This session will cover the basics of evaluation including how to plan for evaluation, how to meet funding agency evaluation needs, and how to use evaluation for your own benefit. Presented by: Dr. Duane Shell, Educational Psychology Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website. SSP - UNL
Views: 3121 unlbosr
An Introduction to NVivo7 for Qualitative Data Analysis
 
01:06:17
Qualitative researchers work with a variety of data: transcripts, diaries, case notes, and even pictures. Managing all this rich data can often be daunting. NVivo7, the latest tool in Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis (CAQDAS), is designed for qualitative researchers who need to combine subtle coding with qualitative linking, shaping, searching and modelling. This 1-hour NVivo7 demonstration will give an overview of how the software can facilitate the coding, analysis and modelling of research findings in the context of qualitative & mixed methods study designs. The demonstation is free and is opened to graduate students as well as faculty members. Presented by: Marie-Hélène Paré, Licensed QSR NVivo Trainer Sponsored by the Office of Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research (OQMMR) and the SSP Core. Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website.
Views: 2844 unlbosr
SSP - MISSING DATA IN MULTILEVEL AND LONGITUDINAL MODELS
 
01:44:22
In this session the missing data issues/situations that are unique to multilevel and longitudinal data sets will be addressed. This session will extend the information provided in the previous sessions to multilevel and longitudinal models. The session will begin with a presentation from 1-4pm, followed by an hour in a computer lab setting where Dr. Lattvay will provide hands-on support for applying what was addressed in this session. Missing data is an issue nearly everyone working with data has to deal with. Missing data occurs in many different ways, such as refusals and “don’t know” responses in surveys, experimental participants not completing tasks, equipment failure, loss of subjects before a study is complete, and many more. The default method for handling missing data in many software packages is not always the best approach as it often eliminates entire cases that are missing information on any of the variables in the analysis; however, new approaches have been developed and there are now a variety of methods for handling missing data. This workshop series is designed to increase applied researchers’ understanding of the missing data problem so that they can choose the best method for handling their data in a way to minimize bias and make the most of the information that they have. The series includes a session to introduce the topic, hands-on sessions focusing on two popular methods for handling missing data: Multiple Imputation (MI) and Full Information Maximum Likelihood (FIML), and a session addressing missing data in multilevel and longitudinal models.
Views: 1435 unlbosr
SSP Missing Data Workshop 6 Sept-07, Part 1
 
01:24:01
Missing data is an issue nearly everyone working with data has to deal with. Missing data occurs in many different ways, such as refusals and “don’t know” responses in surveys, experimental participants not completing tasks, equipment failure, loss of subjects before a study is complete, and many more. The default method for handling missing data in many software packages is not always the best approach as it often eliminates entire cases that are missing information on any of the variables in the analysis; however, new approaches have been developed and there are now a variety of methods for handling missing data. This workshop series is designed to increase applied researchers’ understanding of the missing data problem so that they can choose the best method for handling their data in a way to minimize bias and make the most of the information that they have. The series includes a session to introduce the topic, hands-on sessions focusing on two popular methods for handling missing data: Multiple Imputation (MI) and Full Information Maximum Likelihood (FIML), and a session addressing missing data in multilevel and longitudinal models. Presented by Dr. Levente Littvay, who recently received his PhD in Political Science with a focus on research methods at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. INTRODUCTION TO MISSING DATA Thursday, September 6, 2007 This session will introduce the missing data problem and work towards the best solution for each analytical situation. It will include an overview of classical and commonly used missing data techniques, a discussion of software defaults, and highlight the possible problems that stem from each of these approaches. The session will introduce the modern alternatives to dealing with missing data and will also show how an in depth understanding of missing data problems can broaden our knowledge of analytical problems that are seemingly unrelated to missing data.
Views: 831 unlbosr
AN INTRODUCTION TO QUALITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS USING SOFTWARE
 
01:06:35
You've probably heard of software packages such as SPSS, SAS and MiniTab that are used for analyzing quantitative data. But, what do we do when our data consists of hundreds of pages of text and images? Researchers can choose to use qualitative data analysis software such as NVivo, Atlas.ti, HyperResearch and MAXqda. This session will review basic principles of qualitative research and the software packages that are available to analyze qualitative data and will show how software can be an effective tool for qualitative data analysis using Atlas.ti as an example. Presented by: Dr. Ronald J. Shope Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website.
Views: 24526 unlbosr
New Investigator and Early Career Grant Opportunities Form
 
01:33:37
An overview of NIH and NSF grant mechanisms with an emphasis on the types of awards specifically targeted to new investigators and related opportunities where first time funding is a more likely outcome.
Views: 127 unlbosr
CONTEXT AND CHANGE IN HEALTH RESEARCH: A MULTILEVEL MODEL APPROACH
 
02:38:13
The one hour lecture introduced researchers to the logic of multilevel modeling for the analysis of context effects (e.g. neighborhood, family, hospital, therapy group, occupations, schools) on health, and for studying changes in health and health trajectories. Although seemingly two very different topics, the methods for analyzing individuals nested in contexts (e.g. individuals in occupations) is the same as methods for analyzing repeated measures within individuals and changes in health over time. This lecture used examples from health research and examined the kinds of context and change questions that are possible to answer with the increasingly complex data sets available to researchers. Presented by Dr. Julia McQuillan
Views: 1161 unlbosr
UNIT NONRESPONSE WHEN COLLECTING DATA. WHEN AND HOW MUCH SHOULD WE WORRY?
 
01:02:28
Nonresponse bias is one of the potential sources of error when collecting data on human population. The recent decline in response rates in telephone surveys, for example, worries many researchers about the representativeness of their final sample. In this lecture nonresponse will be decomposed showing the relationship between response rates and bias for the statistics of interest. Methods for assessing nonresponse bias and to improve response rates will be discussed in light of recent publications in the field. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) guidelines on acceptable response rates will be also presented because of the potential interest when conducting surveys with federally sponsored research. A list of current references will be made available to participants. Presented by: Mario Callegaro Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website.
Views: 241 unlbosr
AN INTRODUCTION TO MIXED METHODS RESEARCH
 
59:18
Interest in using research approaches that mix quantitative and qualitative data and analysis has emerged to the point where mixed methods research is now considered as a third methodological approach along side quantitative and qualitative research (Tashakkori & Teddlie, 2003; Johnson & Onwuegbuzie, 2004). While interest is growing, most researchers currently lack a clear definition of this approach and an understanding of when it can or should be used. This session will present a straightforward introduction to mixed methods research by addressing the questions most often asked by researchers new to mixed methods: What is this approach? When should it be used? What are its advantages over other approaches? What designs are available? Is it realistic to use this approach? The discussion of these issues will be augmented with examples drawn from across the social and health sciences. Presented by: Dr. John Creswell, Educational Psychology Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website.
Views: 6042 unlbosr
Seeking Doctoral Dissertation Support from the National Science Foundation?
 
01:21:36
This talk examines Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grants program as administered by the Division of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation. A general discussion of the program will be presented as well as program specific requirements. Information will be provided on typical pitfalls in the process as well as restrictions of the manner in which funding can be used. SSP
Views: 56 unlbosr
CONNECTING RESEARCH OBJECTIVES WITH APPROPRIATE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES
 
01:03:34
This session will walk you through a protocol template designed to guide you through the issues you will need to address when planning a research project. Attending this session will help you produce a higher quality proposal by helping you identify the relavent details for your project from general objectives (typically stated in subject matter terms) through determining the most effective design and analysis (typically stated in “methodology-speak”). Presented by: Dr. Walt Stroup, Statistics Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website.
Views: 767 unlbosr
SSP Missing Data Workshop 6 Sept-07, Part 2
 
01:25:57
Missing data is an issue nearly everyone working with data has to deal with. Missing data occurs in many different ways, such as refusals and “don’t know” responses in surveys, experimental participants not completing tasks, equipment failure, loss of subjects before a study is complete, and many more. The default method for handling missing data in many software packages is not always the best approach as it often eliminates entire cases that are missing information on any of the variables in the analysis; however, new approaches have been developed and there are now a variety of methods for handling missing data. This workshop series is designed to increase applied researchers’ understanding of the missing data problem so that they can choose the best method for handling their data in a way to minimize bias and make the most of the information that they have. The series includes a session to introduce the topic, hands-on sessions focusing on two popular methods for handling missing data: Multiple Imputation (MI) and Full Information Maximum Likelihood (FIML), and a session addressing missing data in multilevel and longitudinal models. Presented by Dr. Levente Littvay, who recently received his PhD in Political Science with a focus on research methods at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. INTRODUCTION TO MISSING DATA Thursday, September 6, 2007 This session will introduce the missing data problem and work towards the best solution for each analytical situation. It will include an overview of classical and commonly used missing data techniques, a discussion of software defaults, and highlight the possible problems that stem from each of these approaches. The session will introduce the modern alternatives to dealing with missing data and will also show how an in depth understanding of missing data problems can broaden our knowledge of analytical problems that are seemingly unrelated to missing data.
Views: 285 unlbosr
THE STRUCTURE OF NIH GRANT APPLICATIONS
 
01:03:26
This session summarized the required elements of an NIH grant application. Discussion of each core element (e.g., budget, personnel, specific aims, prior studies, research methods and design, human subjects protection) and where on campus you can get assistance in preparing your grant was covered. This session also provided an introduction to the new required electronic submission format for R03 and R21 applications (eventually all mechanisms will be electronic). This was a joint session with the Behavioral Health Program of Excellence. Presented by: Dr. Dan Hoyt, Sociology Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website. SSP, UNL
Views: 494 unlbosr
UNL Proposal Development Services
 
12:28
This presentation summarized the various support mechanisms at UNL that are available to assist social and behavioral science faculty develop grants. The session addressed the types of resources and support available at each step along the way, from idea generation to final grant submission. Guest speakers from across the campus discussed the services they provide. Speakers included Sara Trickie from proposal development, Susan Lund from the pre-award office, Stacia Jorgenson from the Bureau of Sociological Research, and Mindy Anderson-Knott from SSP. Download the PowerPoint slides of this presentation from here: http://ssp.unl.edu/videos/2008-2-22/powerpoints/ SSP
Views: 25 unlbosr
BOSR info
 
23:26
This presentation summarized the various support mechanisms at UNL that are available to assist social and behavioral science faculty develop grants. The session addressed the types of resources and support available at each step along the way, from idea generation to final grant submission. Guest speakers from across the campus discussed the services they provide. Speakers included Sara Trickie from proposal development, Susan Lund from the pre-award office, Stacia Jorgenson from the Bureau of Sociological Research, and Mindy Anderson-Knott from SSP. Download the PowerPoint slides of this presentation from here: http://ssp.unl.edu/videos/2008-2-22/powerpoints/ SSP
Views: 75 unlbosr
IRB and NUGrant Overview
 
58:49
This presentation provided a step by step explanation of how to submit human participant research proposals via NUgrant, as well as an explanation of the types of information the IRB needs to have in each section of the form. Each of the four forms currently on the IRB part of NUgrant (new protocol application, continuing review application, change in protocol request, and final reports) will be discussed. Speakers include Dr. Daniel Vasgird, Director of the Office of Research Compliance Services, and Becky Freeman, IRB Specialist.
Views: 65 unlbosr
NEAR Center UNL Presentation - about NEAR
 
12:37
This presentation summarized the various support mechanisms at UNL that are available to assist social and behavioral science faculty develop grants. The session addressed the types of resources and support available at each step along the way, from idea generation to final grant submission. Guest speakers from across the campus discussed the services they provide. Speakers included Sara Trickie from proposal development, Susan Lund from the pre-award office, Stacia Jorgenson from the Bureau of Sociological Research, and Mindy Anderson-Knott from SSP. Download the PowerPoint slides of this presentation from here: http://ssp.unl.edu/videos/2008-2-22/powerpoints/ SSP
Views: 9 unlbosr
RESEARCHER PANEL Part 2
 
44:52
Want to do research, but don’t know where to begin? Learn from other UNL researchers how they progressed from beginning researchers to where they are today. The panel participants discussed how they got started in research, tips on funding opportunities, and lessons they’ve learned. The panel included Sue Sheridan from Educational Psychology, Marc Kiviniemi from Psychology, and Rose Torres Stone from Sociology.
Views: 26 unlbosr
UNL Sponsored Programs Office of Research
 
24:06
This presentation summarized the various support mechanisms at UNL that are available to assist social and behavioral science faculty develop grants. The session addressed the types of resources and support available at each step along the way, from idea generation to final grant submission. Guest speakers from across the campus discussed the services they provide. Speakers included Sara Trickie from proposal development, Susan Lund from the pre-award office, Stacia Jorgenson from the Bureau of Sociological Research, and Mindy Anderson-Knott from SSP. Download the PowerPoint slides of this presentation from here: http://ssp.unl.edu/videos/2008-2-22/powerpoints/ SSP
Views: 50 unlbosr
RESEARCHER PANEL Part 1
 
20:25
Want to do research, but don’t know where to begin? Learn from other UNL researchers how they progressed from beginning researchers to where they are today. The panel participants discussed how they got started in research, tips on funding opportunities, and lessons they’ve learned. The panel included Sue Sheridan from Educational Psychology, Marc Kiviniemi from Psychology, and Rose Torres Stone from Sociology.
Views: 23 unlbosr
Measuring Success
 
43:29
How do we measure success? A lecture. (Unfortunately the last 15 minutes of this presentation was not captured)
Views: 17 unlbosr
UNL - SSP - Support for Writing Grants
 
20:34
This presentation summarized the various support mechanisms at UNL that are available to assist social and behavioral science faculty develop grants. The session addressed the types of resources and support available at each step along the way, from idea generation to final grant submission. Guest speakers from across the campus discussed the services they provide. Speakers included Sara Trickie from proposal development, Susan Lund from the pre-award office, Stacia Jorgenson from the Bureau of Sociological Research, and Mindy Anderson-Knott from SSP. Download the PowerPoint slides of this presentation from here: http://ssp.unl.edu/videos/2008-2-22/powerpoints/ SSP
Views: 31 unlbosr
AN INTRODUCTION TO SAMPLING AND POWER ANALYSIS
 
01:00:42
I’ve decided on a design. Now, how many observations do I need? Sample size is a critically important factor in conducting successful research. A needlessly large sample is expensive and may be counter-productive, but an inadequate sample can prevent you from detecting important differences. This session will cover the various factors to consider when determining the “right” sample size for your research. Presented by: Dr. Walt Stroup, Statistics Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website. SSP
Views: 1543 unlbosr
AN INTRODUCTION TO SURVEY RESEARCH
 
01:02:00
What survey research design is most appropriate for my research needs? This session will focus on how to include a survey research component in your proposal. Various survey data collection modes (telephone interviews, personal interviews, mail, web, etc.) will be described to help you determine the appropriate survey design for your research needs. This session will also cover basic questionnaire design and pretesting issues to help guide you through the process of conducting survey research. Presented by: Dr. Robert Belli, Psychology/SRAM; Mindy Anderson-Knott, SSP Core Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website.
Views: 2029 unlbosr
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
 
55:24
The objective of this session provided an introduction to the types of social science research supported by the National Institute of Health (NIH). This session offered an overview of the types of grant opportunities and announcements (e.g., RFA, RFP), NIH agencies and centers with particular relevance to social scientists (e.g., NIMH, NIDA, NICHD), and grant mechanisms with a particular emphasis on those appropriate for new investigators (e.g., R03, R21, K01). This was a joint session with the Behavioral Health Program of Excellence. Presented by: Dr. Dan Hoyt, Sociology Download the accompanying Powerpoint presentation from our 'previous workshops' section on our website. SSP, UNL
Views: 187 unlbosr